Catalan Map (1375), Europe. National Library, Paris. Photo: Wikipedia

The European Spectator was founded in 2007. The European Spectator analyses, informs and writes about European integration, interdependence and cooperation. The focus is on history and art their different interpretations at European, national, regional or local level. Four periods and themes are being dealt with in particular: the Roman Empire and romanization, the eleventh and twelfth centuries and Romanesque art, the long nineteenth century (1815-1918) and its aftermath the Interbellum (1919-1939) and the functioning of the European Union. The European Spectator focuses in particular on Belgium, France, Germany, Great Britain, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Spain.

News

Happy Birthday Mickey

Mickey Mouse celebrates his nineteenth birthday. To mark this event an exhibition explores his influence on art and pop culture. The interactive exhibition in New York, where Mickey saw the daylight, although he was born in Los Angeles in 1928, is inspired by Mickey’s status and his consistent impact on the arts and creativity in … Read more » “Happy Birthday Mickey”

Feature

The Forgotten WismarTribunal

The official inauguration of the Royal-Swedish Tribunal in Wismar on 17 May 1653 was a festive occasion. The Wismar Tribunal (Wismarer Tribunal) was the highest court of appeal of the Swedish territories on German soil.  The Swedish Crown acquired West Pommern (VorPommern) and other territories, (including the cities Stettin, Stralsund, Greifswald, the bishopries of Bremen-Verden and Hamburg and the … Read more » “The Forgotten WismarTribunal”

Newsletter

The World’s oldest working Planetarium

Else Eisinga was born in a small Frisian village in 1744. He worked from early age on the the wool combing business of his father and he became himself a true master of this craft, and even won an international prize in 1820. That is not why he is still well known however. His self-study … Read more » “The World’s oldest working Planetarium”

Agenda

War to the Destroyers

The Victor Hugo House and the Musée du Temps present an exhibition dedicated to Victor Hugo (1802-1885) and his commitment to preserving cultural heritage. He wrote a pamphlet about this in 1832. Interest in the Middle Ages and its heritage was born in France at the beginning of the nineteenth century, at the beginning of … Read more » “War to the Destroyers”

Churchill´s Europe

America’s National Churchill Museum

America’s National Churchill Museum is located on the campus of Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. The museum is the site where Winston Churchill gave his famous Iron Curtain speech on 5 March 1946. This speech actually marked the beginning of the Cold War. A short summary of the speech and its most famous phrase reads … Read more » “America’s National Churchill Museum”

European Affairs

The Power of Images

The discovery of a bust of Julius Caesar by French archeologists  at the bottom of the Rhône brings into prominence the power of images and propaganda during the last days of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Empire. This bust does not correspond with the approximately 25 busts of Caesar known from the Augustan … Read more » “The Power of Images”

Quote

Although the Romans claimed to be conservative, it was their open mind to other cultures that seems to have empowered their ability to conquer. In this view, Roman imperialism was not only political and military in nature, but also cultural in the sense that they used conquered cultures to shape their own culture and identity. … Read more » “Roman Imperialism”

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