Catalan Map (1375), Europe. National Library, Paris. Photo: Wikipedia

The European Spectator was founded in 2007. The European Spectator analyses, informs and writes about European integration, interdependence and cooperation. The focus is on history and art their different interpretations at European, national, regional or local level. Four periods and themes are being dealt with in particular: the Roman Empire and romanization, the eleventh and twelfth centuries and Romanesque art, the long nineteenth century (1815-1918) and its aftermath the Interbellum (1919-1939) and the functioning of the European Union. The European Spectator focuses in particular on Belgium, France, Germany, Great Britain, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Spain.

News

The Roman Road

The approximately 400 km long Neckar-Alb-Aare Roman Route follows the course of the ancient Via Romana that connected the Roman legion camp of Vindonissa (now Windisch in Swiss Aargau) and the settlement of Grinario (now Köngen near Stuttgart), and was depicted in the Tabula Peutingeriana, a Roman road map. An unusual route that shouldn’t only … Read more » “The Roman Road”

Feature

Nine Eleven is a Day of European Shame

On 9 and 10 November 1938, The ‘Reichskristallnacht’, the Night of Broken Glass, was the outburst of 5 years of indoctrination, violence and propaganda. It was another violent step to the Holocaust, elimination of handicaped peoplr, priests and other unwanted individuals and groups. The ‘enemy’ was the cement of the dictatorship and the Jewish people … Read more » “Nine Eleven is a Day of European Shame”

Newsletter

The World’s oldest working Planetarium

Else Eisinga was born in a small Frisian village in 1744. He worked from early age on the the wool combing business of his father and he became himself a true master of this craft, and even won an international prize in 1820. That is not why he is still well known however. His self-study … Read more » “The World’s oldest working Planetarium”

Agenda

Optical Illusions and Fake News Forever

Optical illusions, trompe-l’oeil, visual trickery and deceptions have always been around, particularly in art. Since antiquity, artists have been playing with our senses, reminding us time and time again how easily we are deceived. With examples from painting, sculpture, video, architecture, design, fashion and interactive virtual-reality works, the exhibition weaves a highly entertaining path through … Read more » “Optical Illusions and Fake News Forever”

Churchill´s Europe

America’s National Churchill Museum

America’s National Churchill Museum is located on the campus of Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. The museum is the site where Winston Churchill gave his famous Iron Curtain speech on 5 March 1946. This speech actually marked the beginning of the Cold War. A short summary of the speech and its most famous phrase reads … Read more » “America’s National Churchill Museum”

European Affairs

European Surrender

One of the most famous paintings of the Spanish painter Diego Velázquez is the Surrender of Breda. Velázquez painted the event in 1634-1635, ten years after it took place. The painting is a symbolic interpretation of the surrender of Breda in 1625, when Spanish troops defeated the beleaguered Dutch city. Two generals confront each other, … Read more » “European Surrender”

Quote

Although the Romans claimed to be conservative, it was their open mind to other cultures that seems to have empowered their ability to conquer. In this view, Roman imperialism was not only political and military in nature, but also cultural in the sense that they used conquered cultures to shape their own culture and identity. … Read more » “Roman Imperialism”

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